Timeline

A suggested schedule to set OKRs
The first time you adopt OKRs, spend some time understanding and explaining what you're trying to gain and how it will impact everyone.
Q - 45 days
Get ready and do your homework:
  • Prepare communication.
  • Draft 2 or 3 company objectives from your strategy and vision.
  • Select teams to pilot OKRs.
Q - 30 days
Communicate with employees:
  • Explain what's coming.
  • Take questions, respond to objections and highlight the benefits you seek.
  • Designate a resource to help teams - the go-to person for questions about goals.
  • Present initial company objectives and show examples of team goals.
Q - 15 days
Introduce company-wide OKRs:
  • Explain why these particular objectives fit in the long term strategy.
  • Set expectations that teams can relate to.
  • Remember these objectives will guide teams for their own OKRs.
Q - 10 days
Teams draft their OKRs.
Q - 1 day
Team objectives are formalized and accessible to everyone who should have access.

START OF QUARTER

Mondays
Get ready for the week ahead.
  • Read updates of related goals and how it affects your own goals.
  • Plan work for the week and reflect on whether it's related to your goals.
Fridays
How was your week? Time to update goals:
  • What have you achieved (related to goals!)?
  • Managers follow up with employees if needed.
  • If some successes, share them.
Every Month
Leadership monitor trends and make sure that all goals are still relevant and current.

END OF QUARTER

Q + 5 days
In each team, grade OKRs and discuss lessons learned:
  • What has worked, what hasn't?
  • If something failed, when did you realize it would not work out?
  • Were our OKRs too easy? too difficult?
You've now been through a few OKR cycles and have perhaps introduced individual goals.
Q - 15 days
Introduce company-wide OKRs:
  • Explain why these particular objectives fit in the long term strategy.
  • Set expectations that teams can relate to.
  • Remember these objectives will guide teams for their own OKRs.
Q - 10 days
Employees and managers draft their team and individual OKRs.
Q - 1 day
OKRs are formalized and accessible to everyone who should have access.

START OF QUARTER

Mondays
Get ready for the week ahead.
  • Read updates of related goals and how it affects your own goals.
  • Plan work for the week and reflect on whether it's related to your goals.
Fridays
How was your week? Time to update goals:
  • What have you achieved (related to goals!)?
  • Managers follow up with employees if needed.
  • If some successes, share them.
Every Month
Leadership keep an eye on trends and make sure all goals are still relevant and current.

END OF QUARTER

Q + 5 days
In each team, grade OKRs and discuss lessons learned:
  • What has worked, what hasn't?
  • If something failed, when did you realize it would not work out?
  • Were our OKRs too easy? too difficult?
Who Responsible for...
Company leadership/CEO
  • Selecting meaningful KPIs
  • Setting company-wide objectives
  • Communicating company-wide OKRs
  • Checking alignment of the organization
  • Keeping an eye on trends
  • Presenting the outcome to the entire company
OKR go-to person
Sometimes it's an external coach.
  • Answering questions about goals
  • Helping employees craft better OKRs
  • Organizing retrospective format
Team manager
  • Pre-selecting company (or other team) goals to contribute to
  • Choosing or helping the team choose OKRs
  • Helping each team member pick OKRs
  • Getting approval/sign-off of upper management
  • Monitoring progress and spotting bottlenecks
  • Rating individual OKRs or helping the team grade individual OKRs
Individual contributor
  • Reading and understanding company-wide objectives
  • Participating in team goal writing
  • Authoring own goals
  • Keeping goals updated and doing the work!
  • Helping rate team and individual OKRs